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What exactly is a Will?
As with most of the legal instruments that may be used as part of a well thought out estate plan, you should consider whether you would benefit from having a Florida will and how a Florida will prepared by a knowledgeable estate planning attorney may help you achieve your goals.
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Other links of interest:

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Florida Medical Power of Attorney ::

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Creating a Florida Living Will ::

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Florida Pre Need Guardianship ::
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The Law Offices of J. Manuel Acevedo, P.A., are located at 116 North Park Avenue in Sanford, Florida, 32771.
Attorney Acevedo is a lawyer admitted to practice law in Florida, has clients from Florida, the United States, and other countries, and primarily
serves Seminole County, Volusia County, Orange County, and Lake County, and the following cities: Sanford, Longwood, Lake Mary, Heathrow,
Altamonte Springs, Casselberry, Oviedo, Goldenrod, Fern Park, Forest City, Midway, Geneva, Chuluota, Winter Springs, Wekiva Springs, Deland, Deltona,
Orange City, Debary, Lake Helen, Daytona, Deleon Springs, Orlando, Apopka, Maitland, Lockhart, Azalea Park, Winter Park, Mount Dora, Tavares, and Eustis.
Find information related to additional legal services we provide at immigration attorney, criminal defense attorney, traffic ticket lawyer, and divorce lawyer.
Etate planning consultations may include a discussion of wills, trusts, and other legal instruments to assist our Deltona Estate Planing clients.
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Florida law provides for the disposition of assets of those persons that pass away without having a will, or in legal terms, intestate. Contrary to what some believe, if a person dies without a will, the State does not automatically get everything.
"No one can confidently say that
he will still be living tomorrow."

Euripides
Do You Need a Florida Will?
A will is a legal instrument in which typically a person expresses who they want to receive their personal property and/or their real property when they pass away.
1. The will must be in writing. Oral wills, legally referred to as nuncupative wills, are not valid in Florida.

2. The will must be signed by the person making the will, that is, the testator, at the end of the will.
As with most of the legal instruments that may be used as part of a well thought out estate plan, you should consider whether you would benefit from having a Florida will and how a Florida will prepared by a knowledgeable estate planning attorney may help you achieve your goals.

If you live in Florida and you are thinking about having a Florida will prepared you should consider consulting with a knowledgeable and experienced estate planning attorney to discuss the legal options available to you based on your individual situation.

If you are in the Central Florida area, call us. We will gladly be of service to you.
There is no requirement that a Florida will be typewritten. However, even a handwritten will must typically comply with the requirements described above. Handwritten wills that are not also signed by the required witnesses, legally referred to as holographic wills, are not recognized in Florida.
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Of course there are also rules as to the division of assets for persons that are not married. However, there are many reasons why a person may prefer a different distribution of their assets. Additionally, there are many reasons why a person may want to time some of the distributions and the timing of those distributions may need to vary depending on the intended beneficiary.
Florida Will Requirements
In Florida, a person must be either 18 years of age or older, or an emancipated minor, and be of sound mind in order to make a valid will. In addition to the age and sound mind requirements, there are essentially four additional requirements that must be complied with in order to make a Florida will that is valid. They are as follows:
The more areas your lawyer has experience with, the better off you will likely be. No matter what type of legal concern you have, no matter what type of law, our goal will always be to help you solve your legal issues.

Call attorney Acevedo so that we may schedule a one hour confidential consultation for you right away and help you feel more at ease regarding your individual situation today.
And remember...
3. The testator must sign the will in the presence of at least two witnesses.

4. The witnesses must sign the will in the presence of the testator and in the presence of each other.
Typically, if a married person dies intestate and has no surviving descendants, the entire estate goes to the spouse. However, if a married person dies intestate and the person has children from another relationship or the surviving spouse has children from another relationship, half of the estate goes to the spouse. And typically, in those situations, the other half of the estate goes to the descendants of the person who passed away. But married couples represent less than half of American households.